Muay Thai is an ancient form of martial arts, developed, as the name suggests in the Kingdom of Thailand. Muay Thai is referred to as “The Art of Eight Limbs” and uses eight points of contact the body mimics weapons of war:

  • The hands become the sword and dagger.

  • The shins and forearms act as armor against blows.

  • The elbow fell opponents like a heavy mace or hammer.

  • The legs and knees are the axe and staff.

 

Muay Thai is unique in other ways as well. Thai boxing is different from traditional forms of Western boxing: it includes the use of hands, elbow, feet, and knees.

Accomplished Muay Thai fighters are known for their self-discipline, control, bravery, confidence, truthfulness, modesty, and respect. Muay Thai is an art and therefore must be practiced often with discipline and with proper training.

 

Like a lot of cardiovascular exercise and strength training, Muay Thai improves circulation, builds endurance, and enhances flexibility.  Unlike other forms of exercise, however, Muay Thai teaches leverage - how to punch and how to take a punch. A trained fighter is aware of the weak, fatal points in their opponents; plus, a well-trained Muay Thai fighter knows how to defend strikes from their opponents. Because Muay Thai fighters practice with others, and not just with bags or weights, they better understand and realize the effect of their strikes. “Pad men” are there to help with your guard -  but they will quickly strike with their boxing gloves once you make a mistake.

 

Muay Thai stances and strikes are all distance related: for example, kicking techniques are considered long range applications, punches are medium, and elbows are short range.